Tea Detox – Tips, Tricks And Tea Recipes

Tea Detox - Tips, Tricks And Tea Recipes

I am currently partaking in a short tea detox – not a total fast, but a week-long partial detox that includes only water, teas,
and restricted raw vegan meals. For someone who drinks an excess of 4 cups of coffee a day, I make it a point to do this at least twice a year, just to give my kidneys and entire system a break.

There are a few things to consider when thinking about partaking a tea-cleanse:

1. some teas, especially herbal tea, s can have an adverse effect on any medication you are taking, including the pill. If you are taking any medication, always check with your holistic health care practitioner before going through with a detox, or which herbs you should stay away from.
2. Allergies – keep in mind that this is not the time to try out any new herbal or fad teas you have never tried before. As a person with multiple allergies, I highly advise against doing a tea-cleanse with ingredients you do not know how you will react to.
3. Kids should not do a tea cleanse. Don’t make this a mother-daughter experience, or place your entire family on your quest. This is a detox for you, your body has a different level of need, and tolerance than a child.
4. Stay away from artificial sweeteners – if you must sweeten your teas (and some fruit teas are pretty sour without some help) use honey, agave or another natural sweetener.
5. Stay away from teas with caffeine. Even if you have withdrawal headaches, you should really try to stay away from green and black teas as your withdrawal symptoms indicate a physical addiction. If you feel these symptoms, I highly recommend that you should stay away from caffeine for a longer period of time, than just the time of your cleanse, and later on to not drink more than 1 caffeinated beverage per day. The only exception to the rule is if you have chronic low blood pressure, then drinking a stimulating green or black tea can be fine.
Here are some of my favorite tea mixes to make at home for detox:

Tea mix# 1

3 tablespoons of rosehip
3 tablespoons of raspberry leaves
3 tablespoons of dried corn silk
add to 1 liter of boiling water – allow to steep for 5 minutes – strain, and drink warm

Tea mix # 2

3 tablespoon of dried dandelion leaves
3 tablespoons of dried peppermint
3 tablespoon of dried nettle

add to 1 liter of boiling water – allow to steep for 5 minutes – strain and drink warm

Tea mix # 3

3 tablespoons of dried lemon balm
3 tablespoons of rooibos
3 tablespoons of linden leaves

add to 1 liter of boiling water and allow to steep for 5 minutes – strain and drink warm

 

If you want to read more about tea-detox check out the following books:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer: Always check with your holistic health care professional before undertaking any fasts or diets. The above article contains affiliate links, see Disclosure page for details

 

This blog post is a part of the following blog hops and link ups:

Manic Monday

Balanced And Healthy Living 

Inspire Me Wednesday

Let’s Talk Mommy

 

 

A Gift I Did Not Know I Needed – Herb Scissors

 

A Gift I Did Not Know INeeded - Herb Scissors

Disclaimer: The following post is a sponsored post and contains affiliate links. I received the item for free in return for an honest review. See disclosure page for details

We use a lot of herbs and spices in our daily life. From making our own spice mixes to creating our own tea blends, making our own sauces, and cooking for friends, I spent a lot of time cutting up rosemary and chives, basil and oregano. While a proper kitchen knife is a fine enough tool to get the herbs and spices needed in a proper size, it is not as convenient and fast as the Five-Layered Herb Scissors from Marky Products. Armed with that surprisingly heavy, sturdy and sharp tool, I “cut” my prep time to a few seconds, slicing through anything needed to make the perfect spaghetti sauce and all of the fresh herbs needed for our salad dressings.

Yes, the herbs get stuck in between the five blades, but thankfully the product comes with a small, green “comb”, which cleans between each blade, making the cleanup also a quick action. The five-layered herb scissors are one of those products, I did not know, I needed until it arrived at my doorstep.

Let me give you a quick review summary:

Pro:

1.  Sturdy, heavy duty scissors, that are easy to handle and feel comfortable in my hands.

2. the scissors are comfortable for both right and left-handed people (me), as well as people with bigger hands (my husband)

3. Cuts the cooking prep down to a fraction of the time

4. cleans easy,  due to the cleaning tool included with the scissor purchase

Con:

1. the cleaning tool is another little thing that is easily lost in an already full gadget drawer. It would be even better if the cleaning tool would attach somehow to the scissors for a more convenient storage.

Overall I highly recommend the Five-layer herb scissors from Marky Products as a great addition to a household that cooks a lot, and is into clean, fresh cooking that includes a lot of fresh herbs.

You can purchase the useful herb scissors on Amazon today, and get free two-day shipping with Amazon Prime!

Saffron – An A to Z Challenge Post

S

S is for Saffron:

A to Z Challenge: Saffron
The world’s most expensive spice, this highly valued culinary addition is so powerful that only a few strands are needed to flavor and color an entire dish. Most imported saffron originates from Spain. The ground variety loses its flavor and is often not real saffron.

Matches well with: risotto, soup, tomatoes, mussels, paella and rice

Healing properties: effective in treating mild Alzheimer’s, appetite suppressor, anti-depressant

Magical Properties: healing, love, and to control the weather. Keep saffron sachets in your home to bring happiness. 

If you enjoyed this post, why not check out my book “Mixing Spices: A Flavorful Guide To Creating Awesome Herb And Spice Mixes” available on Amazon now.


Quassia – An A to Z Challenge Post

Q

Q is for Quassia

Quassia - An A to Z Challenge Post

Quassia or Jamaican wood is often added to sodas and bitters, but should be approached with caution. While it has been used as a digestive and to treat anorexia, it has reduced fertility in animal studies.

Used as a contact insecticide as well (which makes you second guess drinking a soda containing this stuff). It is also effective in killing mosquito larvae in ponds, while not harming the fish.

This post was a part of the A to Z Blogging challenge. If you have not checked out some of the wonderful bloggers who are participating, you have missed out. Find them here and on Twitter under the hashtag #AtoZChallenge, and send them some love!

If you enjoyed this blog, please like it and share it with your friends!

Nettle – An A to Z Challenge Post

N

N is for Nettle:

This herb is a powerhouse both culinary as well as medicinal, that is often overlooked by the general public. Nettles, or stinging nettles should be pre-cooked, unless you use them as a tea, and be handled with gloves at all times. The younger the leaves, the more tender the result, which will be similar to that of spinach.

Matches well with: cheese, cream, tomatoes, eggs and onions

Healing Properties: In Germany, this herb is valued highly for its healing powers, sold there as an herbal drug to aid in the relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Its power lies also in relieving symptoms of allergies, without all of the side effects that standard medication brings with it. External uses include skin problems, gout, neuralgia, and hair problems. I drink this tea personally to prevent symptoms of my chronic anemia.

Magical properties: strengthens willpower. If sprinkled around the home, it wards off negativity.

If you enjoyed this post on Nettle, why not check out my book

“Mixing Spices: A Flavorful Guide to Creating Awesome Herb and Spice Mixes”

on Amazon Kindle today! 

Ginger – An A to Z Challenge Blog Post

G

G is for Ginger:

Ginger - A To Z Challenge Post

Did you know that it takes 9 months for ginger to reach maturity? Not until the flowers appear, the tops have begun to die, is the ginger ready to be harvested.

Matches well with: chicken, chocolate, fruit, rice and tomatoes

Healing Properties: aids against nausea, colic, menstrual cramps, travel sickness and bloating. More recently it has been also used for joint problems, due to its anti-inflammatory properties

Magical uses: personal confidence, prosperity and success. A very powerful token, that can be used in amulets, mojo or medicine bags to strengthen and for protection

The following video shows how easy it is to make a Lemon-Ginger-Honey base for a healthy tea, that aids you with relieving cold symptoms.

If you enjoyed this post, check out my book

“Mixing Spices – A Flavorful Guide To Creating Awesome Herb And Spice Mixes”

Available Now!

Fennel – An A to Z Challenge Post

A to Z Challenge Blog: Fennel

F is for Fennel

Fennel - An A to Z Challenge Post

Fennel looks like a mixture between celery and dill, the thick layers of the stem end in thin dill-like leaves, but it taste like neither, more often referred to as “sweet-anise” in flavor. Often used in mediterranean cooking, the base and stems can also be eaten raw.

Matches well with: sausages, cabbage, garlic, figs, potatoes and seafood

Healing properties: a mild appetite suppressant, it is also used to treat asthma, heartburn and high blood pressure. Often included in cough remedies for its ability to aid with respiratory congestion.

Magical properties: often hung at windows and doors to ward off evil. Used in spells for protection and healing.

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